Verus Publishing

Presenting the Works of Edward de Vere

     The Idea of Man presents a new ontology, or idea of human being, by developing the logic that  naturally flows from that which is original, necessary, inherent and essential to this being - upright posture. The verticality of man, simply and mutely constituted by his innate 'uprightness', is taken as the ontological key to understanding the idea of man, the world of  language and the very possibility of Being itself.  In this, the book conceives in unison both an Ontological Anthropology and an Anthropological Ontology.

The Idea of Man

                           Table of Contents
           Prologue
1 - Significance, the Essence of Man
     1a - The Priority of Essence to History
2 - The Significance of Pointing
3 - The Significance of the 'Edge'
4 - The Significance of Language
5 - The Birth of the Person
6 - The Possibility of Knowing
7 - Thinking and Knowing
     7a - Thinking - 'What' Things Are
     7b - Thinking - 'How' Things Are
     7c - Thinking - 'Why' Things Are
8 - Thinking and the World of Things
     8a - The Possibility of Understanding
     8b - Time and the Stillness of Things
       8b(1) - Time and the Passing of Things
       8b(2) - The Ontological Basis of Time
       8b(3) - Time, Eternity and the Significance of Death
     8c - Thinking and the Control of Things
     8d - The Possibility of Being(s) Out of Control
     8e - Time and the Order of Things
     8f - The Ontological Force of Gravity
9 - Thinking and Healing
         Author Notes

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The Idea of Man

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           Prologue  
       If we look at the origin of man, surely there we will find his essence. And with this essence broken from its hiddenness, the 'point' of man's existence, the reason and logic of his being will surely manifest itself. In the light of that manifestation, we will see man clearly and finally gain an understanding of who, how and why he is. So, this entire labor of thought must not only begin, but remain and dwell at the point of his beginning and only there because there and only there is to be derived a good idea of man. From this good idea, got finally right, 'ideas' about man, his history, politics, science and technique, his world of time, space, language and art, his social, psychological and moral nature will flow in a cascade of understanding that is simple, accessible and nourishing to his soul. So, by all means, let's begin at the beginning.